Eric Carle

Highly acclaimed illustrator and children's book author, Eric Carle uses a variety of collage materials to depict both familial and natural themes and communicate universal life experiences.

Wassily Kandinsky

Considered the father of Abstract Expressionism, Wassily Kandinsky was heavily influenced by music. He strived to make the canvas sing.

Claude Monet

Arguably one of the most widely recognized artists of all time, Claude Monet was originally mocked for his work and called an Impressionist because of his imprecise painting style. He and fellow artists decided to adopt this name and started the Impressionist movement.

Katsushika Hokusai

A master in the Japanese art of woodblock printing, Hokusai started drawing at the age of five and drew every day. He produced more than 30,000 prints during his lifetime.

Mary Cassatt

One of the most famous female artists, Mary Cassatt succeeded during a time dominated by male artists. She introduced America to Impressionism and advised prominent collectors, shaping some of America's treasured museum collections.

Jim Henson

An award-winning puppeteer and a pioneer in children's television, Jim Henson demonstrated his positive view of the world with his magical muppets, and he gave the gift of laughter to millions of people worldwide.

David Hockney

Possibly the United Kingdom's most famous living artist, David Hockney and his prolific work are difficult to categorize. Though best known for his paintings, he has experimented with a variety of styles and materials including photo montages, photocopies, stage sets, and more.

Michelangelo Buonarroti

One of the most famous Italian Renaissance artists, Michelangelo often braved difficult working conditions and was subjected to the demands of his wealthy patrons. He is best-known for several famous sculptures and for painting the Sistine Chapel ceiling.

Andy Goldsworthy

A pre-eminent Environmental artist, Andy Goldsworthy creates magnificent work typically using indigenous, natural materials such as leaves, rocks, twigs, and sand, often without tools. His ephemeral work weathers the effects of time and is often experienced solely through photographs.

Edgar Degas

Perhaps best known for his sculptures and paintings of ballerinas and horses, Edgar Degas was an Impressionist artist with a unique style.

Totem Poles

An early American artform that continues today, totem poles use symbolic animals and colors to tell stories about American Indian history and heritage.

Faith Ringgold

Known for her exceptional story quilts, Faith Ringgold celebrates her childhood experiences in her Harlem neighborhood and the importance of her African-American heritage.

William Johnson

Known as a Harlem Renaissance painter, William Johnson was a classically trained artist who chose to paint in a naive style using only four or five colors. His scenes often depict African-American experiences.

Zen Gardens

Representing the garden as an art form, Japanese Zen gardens often play with the illusion of space, using small trees (Bonsai), and rocks of various sizes. The artistic environments of Zen gardens encourage tranquility and reflection.

Alexander Calder

Originally trained as an engineer, Alexander Calder combined his understanding of balance and motion, his fascination of the universe, and his playful nature to create amazing mobiles and stabiles.

Lascaux Cave Paintings

Only discovered in 1940, the cave paintings of Lascaux provide fascinating insight into the life and times of the earliest man and early artistic expression.

Vincent Van Gogh

Though internationally recognized today, surprisingly Vincent Van Gogh only sold one painting during his lifetime. Painting in a unique style, he is best known for his use of vibrant colors and bold brushstrokes.

Grandma Moses

Capturing a bygone American era, Grandma Moses began painting when she was 76 years old. Her quaint rural scenes remain popular today. In fact, one of her paintings is on display in the White House.

Jasper Johns

At the forefront of the American art world for more than 50 years, Jasper Johns is a painter, printmaker, and sculptor who laid the foundation for Pop Art and Minimalism.

Ogata Korin

One of the most important Japanese artists of the 17th century, Ogata Korin created images often inspired by songs or poems.

Auguste Rodin

Known for his realism and attention to detail, Auguste Rodin once created a major sculpture that was so realistic viewers thought he had cast it from a live model. In 1900, he was declared the world's greatest living sculptor.

Rembrandt van Rijn

Widely recognized during his lifetime, Rembrandt is considered one of the masters of the Dutch Golden Age. He achieved success quickly, however, his avid collection of artifacts eventually led to his ruin.

Pablo Picasso

One of the founding fathers of Cubism, Pablo Picasso was a prolific artist whose work spanned many different styles of modern art.

Dorothea Lange

Communicating unique compassion through her iconic photographs, Dorothea Lange documented moments of desperation and captured the undying American spirit during the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression.

Yann Arthus-Bertrand

Famous for his incredible photographs of the Earth from above, Yann Arthus-Bertrand passionately advocates for sustainability.

Louise Nevelson

A pioneer of recycling, Louise Nevelson often used discarded, or found objects, to design her abstract sculptures and assemblages.

Jackson Pollock

One of the most controversial modern artists, Jackson Pollock purposefully splattered paint onto large canvases to create his action paintings. His success shifted the focus of the art world from Europe to America in the late 1940s.

Frida Kahlo

A woman known for her political convictions and fiery spirit, Frida Kahlo created works of great introspection. When she married artist, Diego Rivera, they became a celebrity couple, and she achieved international fame as an artist.

Jan Van Eyck

Known for his exquisitely detailed, intricate paintings, Jan Van Eyck created very few works of art. However, his art documents life and culture in the 15th century.

Norman Rockwell

One of the most beloved American illustrators, Norman Rockwell depicted life in small town America and highlighted important issues of the day for magazines, newspapers, and books.

Julian Beever

A British pavement chalk artist, Julian Beever creates realistic three-dimensional illusions that delight and deceive the public around the world.

Andy Warhol

A true art superstar, Andy Warhol is best known for his Pop Art capitalizing on images from American culture and consumer society of the 1950s and 60s.

Frederic Remington

Romanticizing the action and drama of the American Wild West, Frederic Remington created images and sculptures of horses, cowboys, military figures, and life on the western frontier.

Leonardo da Vinci

A true Renaissance man, Leonardo da Vinci was a painter, sculptor, musician, philosopher, inventor, writer, architect, botanist, biologist, mathematician, engineer, and a costume and stage designer. Many of his ideas have stood the test of time and remain relevant today.

Frank Lloyd Wright

Arguably one of the greatest architects of all time, Frank Lloyd Wright designed buildings that challenged traditional boundaries. His goal was to create buildings that would enhance and integrate with the surrounding environment.

Georgia O'Keeffe

A fiercely independent woman, Georgia O'Keeffe painted flowers and scenes of the southwest in a highly stylized manner. She is recognized as one of the most famous female American artists of the twentieth century.

Dale Chihuly

World-renowned Contemporary glass artist, Dale Chihuly is a joyful character who is best known for his spirit of collaboration, blending art and nature in colorful glass installations and sculptures.

Diego Rivera

With strong and sometimes controversial political convictions, Mexican muralist, Diego Rivera painted stories about the lives of everyday people in public places providing universal access to art. His talent as a storyteller and his marriage to artist Frida Kahlo made him a celebrity of his time.

Johannes Vermeer

Overlooked for almost two centuries, Baroque genre painter, Jan Vermeer has become famous for his use of light and nearly photographic realism.

Romare Bearden

A Harlem Renaissance artist, Romare Bearden was influenced by African-American writers, musicians, and activists of his time. He experimented with a variety of materials in his art, but he is best known for his collages.

René Magritte

Belgian Surrealist, René Magritte, playfully challenges viewers to consider each of his images within the framework of reality.

T'ang Yin

One of the four great masters of China's Ming dynasty, T'ang Yin demonstrated a deep reverence for nature which is typical of Asian art.

Package A (ages 4-5)

Eric Carle

Highly acclaimed illustrator and children's book author, Eric Carle uses a variety of collage materials to depict both familial and natural themes and communicate universal life experiences.

Wassily Kandinsky

Considered the father of Abstract Expressionism, Wassily Kandinsky was heavily influenced by music. He strived to make the canvas sing.

Claude Monet

Arguably one of the most widely recognized artists of all time, Claude Monet was originally mocked for his work and called an Impressionist because of his imprecise painting style. He and fellow artists decided to adopt this name and started the Impressionist movement.

Katsushika Hokusai

A master in the Japanese art of woodblock printing, Hokusai started drawing at the age of five and drew every day. He produced more than 30,000 prints during his lifetime.

Mary Cassatt

One of the most famous female artists, Mary Cassatt succeeded during a time dominated by male artists. She introduced America to Impressionism and advised prominent collectors, shaping some of America's treasured museum collections.

Jim Henson

An award-winning puppeteer and a pioneer in children's television, Jim Henson demonstrated his positive view of the world with his magical muppets, and he gave the gift of laughter to millions of people worldwide.

Package B (ages 5-7)

David Hockney

Possibly the United Kingdom's most famous living artist, David Hockney and his prolific work are difficult to categorize. Though best known for his paintings, he has experimented with a variety of styles and materials including photo montages, photocopies, stage sets, and more.

Michelangelo Buonarroti

One of the most famous Italian Renaissance artists, Michelangelo often braved difficult working conditions and was subjected to the demands of his wealthy patrons. He is best-known for several famous sculptures and for painting the Sistine Chapel ceiling.

Andy Goldsworthy

A pre-eminent Environmental artist, Andy Goldsworthy creates magnificent work typically using indigenous, natural materials such as leaves, rocks, twigs, and sand, often without tools. His ephemeral work weathers the effects of time and is often experienced solely through photographs.

Edgar Degas

Perhaps best known for his sculptures and paintings of ballerinas and horses, Edgar Degas was an Impressionist artist with a unique style.

Totem Poles

An early American artform that continues today, totem poles use symbolic animals and colors to tell stories about American Indian history and heritage.

Faith Ringgold

Known for her exceptional story quilts, Faith Ringgold celebrates her childhood experiences in her Harlem neighborhood and the importance of her African-American heritage.

Package C (ages 7-8)

William Johnson

Known as a Harlem Renaissance painter, William Johnson was a classically trained artist who chose to paint in a naive style using only four or five colors. His scenes often depict African-American experiences.

Zen Gardens

Representing the garden as an art form, Japanese Zen gardens often play with the illusion of space, using small trees (Bonsai), and rocks of various sizes. The artistic environments of Zen gardens encourage tranquility and reflection.

Alexander Calder

Originally trained as an engineer, Alexander Calder combined his understanding of balance and motion, his fascination of the universe, and his playful nature to create amazing mobiles and stabiles.

Lascaux Cave Paintings

Only discovered in 1940, the cave paintings of Lascaux provide fascinating insight into the life and times of the earliest man and early artistic expression.

Vincent Van Gogh

Though internationally recognized today, surprisingly Vincent Van Gogh only sold one painting during his lifetime. Painting in a unique style, he is best known for his use of vibrant colors and bold brushstrokes.

Grandma Moses

Capturing a bygone American era, Grandma Moses began painting when she was 76 years old. Her quaint rural scenes remain popular today. In fact, one of her paintings is on display in the White House.

Package D (ages 8-9)

Jasper Johns

At the forefront of the American art world for more than 50 years, Jasper Johns is a painter, printmaker, and sculptor who laid the foundation for Pop Art and Minimalism.

Ogata Korin

One of the most important Japanese artists of the 17th century, Ogata Korin created images often inspired by songs or poems.

Auguste Rodin

Known for his realism and attention to detail, Auguste Rodin once created a major sculpture that was so realistic viewers thought he had cast it from a live model. In 1900, he was declared the world's greatest living sculptor.

Rembrandt van Rijn

Widely recognized during his lifetime, Rembrandt is considered one of the masters of the Dutch Golden Age. He achieved success quickly, however, his avid collection of artifacts eventually led to his ruin.

Pablo Picasso

One of the founding fathers of Cubism, Pablo Picasso was a prolific artist whose work spanned many different styles of modern art.

Dorothea Lange

Communicating unique compassion through her iconic photographs, Dorothea Lange documented moments of desperation and captured the undying American spirit during the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression.

Package E (ages 9-10)

Yann Arthus-Bertrand

Famous for his incredible photographs of the Earth from above, Yann Arthus-Bertrand passionately advocates for sustainability.

Louise Nevelson

A pioneer of recycling, Louise Nevelson often used discarded, or found objects, to design her abstract sculptures and assemblages.

Jackson Pollock

One of the most controversial modern artists, Jackson Pollock purposefully splattered paint onto large canvases to create his action paintings. His success shifted the focus of the art world from Europe to America in the late 1940s.

Frida Kahlo

A woman known for her political convictions and fiery spirit, Frida Kahlo created works of great introspection. When she married artist, Diego Rivera, they became a celebrity couple, and she achieved international fame as an artist.

Jan Van Eyck

Known for his exquisitely detailed, intricate paintings, Jan Van Eyck created very few works of art. However, his art documents life and culture in the 15th century.

Norman Rockwell

One of the most beloved American illustrators, Norman Rockwell depicted life in small town America and highlighted important issues of the day for magazines, newspapers, and books.

Package F (ages 10-11)

Julian Beever

A British pavement chalk artist, Julian Beever creates realistic three-dimensional illusions that delight and deceive the public around the world.

Andy Warhol

A true art superstar, Andy Warhol is best known for his Pop Art capitalizing on images from American culture and consumer society of the 1950s and 60s.

Frederic Remington

Romanticizing the action and drama of the American Wild West, Frederic Remington created images and sculptures of horses, cowboys, military figures, and life on the western frontier.

Leonardo da Vinci

A true Renaissance man, Leonardo da Vinci was a painter, sculptor, musician, philosopher, inventor, writer, architect, botanist, biologist, mathematician, engineer, and a costume and stage designer. Many of his ideas have stood the test of time and remain relevant today.

Frank Lloyd Wright

Arguably one of the greatest architects of all time, Frank Lloyd Wright designed buildings that challenged traditional boundaries. His goal was to create buildings that would enhance and integrate with the surrounding environment.

Georgia O'Keeffe

A fiercely independent woman, Georgia O'Keeffe painted flowers and scenes of the southwest in a highly stylized manner. She is recognized as one of the most famous female American artists of the twentieth century.

Package G (ages 11-12)

Dale Chihuly

World-renowned Contemporary glass artist, Dale Chihuly is a joyful character who is best known for his spirit of collaboration, blending art and nature in colorful glass installations and sculptures.

Diego Rivera

With strong and sometimes controversial political convictions, Mexican muralist, Diego Rivera painted stories about the lives of everyday people in public places providing universal access to art. His talent as a storyteller and his marriage to artist Frida Kahlo made him a celebrity of his time.

Johannes Vermeer

Overlooked for almost two centuries, Baroque genre painter, Jan Vermeer has become famous for his use of light and nearly photographic realism.

Romare Bearden

A Harlem Renaissance artist, Romare Bearden was influenced by African-American writers, musicians, and activists of his time. He experimented with a variety of materials in his art, but he is best known for his collages.

René Magritte

Belgian Surrealist, René Magritte, playfully challenges viewers to consider each of his images within the framework of reality.

T'ang Yin

One of the four great masters of China's Ming dynasty, T'ang Yin demonstrated a deep reverence for nature which is typical of Asian art.